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Diabetes


Diabetes is a chronic disease, which occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. This leads to an increased concentration of glucose in the blood (hyperglycaemia)


  • Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent or childhood-onset diabetes) is characterized by a lack of insulin production.
  • Type 2 diabetes (formerly called non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes) is caused by the body’s ineffective use of insulin. It often results from excess body weight and physical inactivity.
  • Gestational diabetes is hyperglycaemia that is first recognized during pregnancy.
  • The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 20141
  • The global prevalence of diabetes* among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 20141.
  • Diabetes prevalence has been rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries
  • Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation1
  • In 2012, an estimated 1.5 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes and another 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose**1
  • Almost half of all deaths attributable to high blood glucose occur before the age of 70 years1. WHO projects that diabetes will be the 7th leading cause of death in 2030 2.
  • Almost half of all deaths attributable to high blood glucose occur before the age of 70 years1. WHO projects that diabetes will be the 7th leading cause of death in 2030 2.
  • Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes1



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